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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> other playoff baseball the tampa bay rays lost to the angels. oakland beat detroit. braves won again and the pirates lost to the brewers. >> come on pirates. >> went 3 for 4, two rbis in my softball game. >> you laid down a couple doubles? >> i hit a couple, no one. >> did they bring out the respirator? >>> let's go to the u.s. open. 296th ranked victoria duval stunned samantha stoeser. it is her first win against a top 20 opponent. her family comes from haiti. her father was actually buried in the rubble in the earthquake three years ago and had to be dug out of the rubble. >> that's an incredible story. >>> more drama from the new york jets camp. the team signed former green bay packers quarterback. he was released after losing out to vince young in green bay for the number two spot. harrell expected to report with the team today. another quarterback joins on the jets roster. rex says he may not make anyone a starter until opening day, day of the game. bring in more quarterbacks. >>> still ahead on "morning joe" governor rick snyder joins us ahead of tomorrow's special show in detr
people may not know his speech originated in part in detroit. explain what dr. king was saying two months before. guest: yes, i'm from detroit and i grew up there. with aretha franklin's father and many other prominent ministers in detroit. dr.king participated in a huge march in detroit leading down near cobal hall where he delivered a similar speech and he talked about using our resources to make sure justice will be delivered. he talked about some of the same things he did in washington. he also talked about obviously detroit being the headquarters of a tremendous labor movement with u.a.w. the local focus in terms of negro rights was extraordinarily powerful. so dr. king founded some of those things but of course took them to a new level in washington. host: from june of 1963 two months before the march on washington. this is put together from motown records. >> i have a dream this afternoon. my four little children will not come up in the same young days that i came up. they will be judged on the basis of the content of their character and not the color of their skin. i have a dre
in new york this morning and spread across to cities like chicago, charlotte north carolina, and detroit. workers say they want to earn $15 an hour, nearly double the current minimum wage. lois is the history professor at cornell university, and she joins us now from ihnica new york. can you hear me now. >> obviously we are having a little difficult with our life feed there. question will try to come back to them later. the justice department says it will not sue the state's of colorado and washington to block them from legalized recreational marijuana use. instead, the government outlines its priorities for enforcing the laws including keeping pot out of the hands of minors and keeping the drug cart tells out. this leaves many trying to figure out how to make money off this newly legal industry. in abatement room, he gives us a small whiff of the future of big weed. >> we won some awards for this, if you smell it you will get -- blueberry cheesecake. >> this is a 500 square feet growing room, but his company is permitted for nearly 20 times that. we help provide over 10,000 patients wit
government must step in to ensure the state and local government. the problem detroit faced is that -- >> state, local, and tribal government. >> and tribal government. [laughter] >> okay. >> the problem with detroit, unlike many municipalities that depend on revenue from real estate tax, they run on income taxes. they never recovered from 2001. the black unemployment rate never recovered from 2001. that downturn decimated the revenue stream for the city, and it never came back. if there are banks that are too big to fail, and we have to step in to make sure they function, there are cities that are too big to fail. [applause] >> bankruptcy in one of those cities. >> yes, and so it is not enough for the administration to say, oh, we're behind you, droit. no. we said to wall street, $800 billion we're behind you, so that's being behind me. [laughter] >> okay. behind you, what are the policies? >> so, wall street caused more damage than what we have put into the budget. there needs to be a financial transaction tax because when they gamble, we lose. [applause] they have to pay
at that. oh, my god. >> that jungle cat is terrorizing residents in this neighborhood in detroit. >> like they don't have enough issues in detroit. >> it's unclear what breed it is or if it is a ferile cat. oh, that is scary. something gray -- gray and black marks and kids in the neighborhood say they are scared. >> i'm going to run, for one. i be scared to walk the neighborhood because it come out on you. it's not scared. >> it ran to me, so i ran. i ran in the house. it was real scary. i said i never going back there again. >> it looks like a cat with really long legs. >> yeah, large cat. >> studies show there are thousands of stray cats roaming detroit. the michigan humane society promises now to investigate. >> you know what works, moth balls. detroit really is reverting to its natural state, you know what i mean? wild animals roaming eating the population. >>> let's check in with janice dean with a look at the weather. >> i haven't spotted any stray cats around here. >> just large rats, new york. >> wow, those can be scary. absolutely. >> more rats than there are people. >> this big
people have strong 04. you cannot rob people in detroit of their pensions. if we stand by while they take their pensions, they will take our pensions. don't think it will happen -- will happen to us. they will do it again. inequality is a skirt on our society. and -- a scourge on our society. and yes, we're talking about $7 an hour workers and we got to do something about it, but on this side of it, some people are doing pretty good. between 1979 and 2007, a time frame of all of a less than 20 years, real income went up by the 240% for those in the top 1%. it is a shameful thing. it is a moral issue. we've got to fight back. our economy is capable of producing enough good paying jobs for everyone. [applause] our economy can do it. this economy can do it. but we cannot do it while we are getting trade deals that are shipping our jobs overseas. they just leaned on us a few months ago for this south. deal that they said would create jobs. the -- this south korea deal that they said would create jobs. it has already cost jobs. i'm not against trade. but these are not really trade deals, but i
is in detroit. caller: i am currently a student at wayne state university. the question is is college worth the cost. it is not i feel worth the cost. we are facing a situation where i -- i may not be able to pay for classes in the fall. even over an academic issue, but over the content -- contract i have with housing. i might be kicked out of school this semester. >> you have a conflict with what? >> with the housing right now. >> is that because it is too expensive or there are too many people in the housing unit? >> just filed for bankruptcy, detroit. they are trying to increase my tuition. housing is too much. foricole, thank you calling in and sharing your story. this was the subject of an article earlier this week, and they pulled him out about student loans. "more students rely than ever on federal student loans aid. "more students rely than ever on federal student loans aid. she covered today's speech by president obama and we spoke to her earlier earlier in the afternoon for her thoughts. what new ground did the calls forbreak in lowering college costs? >> this is a more expansive
americans died over the city of detroit. only then was that a political will to say we now need to use 21st century technology which we have against the terrorists. so if you look at it right now in a world where they only have to be right 1% of the time we have to be right 100% of the time on defense we should use one of our few at images which is technology and the vast majority of the explosive detection systems in place today aren't capable of detecting either this type of clothing soaked in liquid explosives nor are they capable of detecting even say the surgically implanted bombs or something as basic as the underwear bomber. most are designed to do -- magnetometers detect metal. that is not the explosive itself. usually the only medal medal involved as the detonator so if you are able to designed explosives with no metal detector, you effectively have made that system. we are living in the stone age's on most of the magnetometer technology we are using. our one advantage which is bring for this modern advanced imaging technology to allow us to level the playing field in the last thin
to take place. >> juan, go ahead and respond to wayne there. weologist know, detroit, 41% poverty rate and st. louis 21%. the ten most dangerous cities in the country have the highest, most elevated poverty numbers in the country. >> yeah, poverty, unemployment, failure drops out from school and, guess what, a high percentage of minority. it hurts my heart. but, wayne, this is what you need. you need leadership that will come in and speak to kids who are not advancing and who are not making any progress and, instead, get involved with gang activity and with violence and this is how they can prove there is somebody in this world. that's a losing prescription. you have to believe in education. you have to believe in a job and building a resume. i don't think that this is a mystery if you want to make it in america. >> jonathan, there is -- >> even maybe a minimum wage job that would keep a young person out of trouble and focused on producing on the future. i mean, there's no question the gang has already pointed out. less likely to be this type of violent crime in a stronger economy. you
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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